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"We shall not cease from exploration
And the end of all our exploring
Will be to arrive where we started
And know the place for the first time." ---T.S. Eliot

Akaysha Tang
唐璨
China Program Director
East Asia & Pacific Program
Office of International Science & Engineering
Office of the Director
National Science Foundation
Associate Professor
Psychology and Neuroscience
Director, Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience
University of New Mexico
(On leave)
office 
703 292-8998
e-mail 
atang@nsf.gov


Contents

Personal Background

Tang earned her first B.S. Degree in Computer Science from Peking University in 1984. She served as a research scientist in the software engineering group at the Software Research Institute, Chinese Academy of Science from 1984 to 1986. Tang earned her second B.S. Degree in Experimental Psychology from Grinnell College in 1990, and her PhD in psychology from Harvard University in 1995. Following the completion of her Ph.D. Tang spent two years as a research associate in the Computational Neurobiology Laboratory of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies with a fellowship from the Howard Hughes Medical Institute. Since 1997, Tang has been serving on the faculty in the Department of Psychology and Department of Neurosciences at the University of New Mexico (UNM). She directs the Laboratory of Cognitive Neuroscience. During this period, she has spent one sabbatical year in the Neuroendocrinology Laboratory at the Rockefeller University (2001-2002) and another in the Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London (2004-2005). From July 2012 to July 2014, Tang served as the Director for the Cognitive Neuroscience Program at the National Science Foundation. From Dec. 2014, Tang has served as the China Program Director within the Office of International Science & Engineering, National Science Foundation.

Research Interest

  • Blind source separation for high density EEG-based functional brain imaging: applications in laboratory and clinical research
  • Effects of early life experience on cognitive, social, emotional, physical, neuroendocrine function

Professional Affiliations

  • Society for Biological Psychiatry
  • International Society for Developmental Psychobiology (board member)
  • Society for Neuroscience
  • Association for Psychological Science
  • Society for Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Organization for Human Brain Mapping

Professional Services

  • NIH, NSF, and US State Department grant review
  • Briefing New Mexico Senator Bingamin on areas of future technological development in brain sciences
  • Serving as an ad hoc reviewer for the following journals:
Science
Journal of Neuroscience
Stress
Hippocampus
NeuroImage
Child Development
Neuroscience
Behavioral Neuroscience
Neuroscience letters
Journal of Neurophysiology
Psychophysiology
Animal Behavior
Hormone and Behavior
Laterality
Neural Computation
IEEE Transaction for Biomedical Engineering
International Journal of Computational Intelligence and Neuroscience
  • Teaching:
Statistical Principles (200 level)
Research Design (300 level)
Seminar on Early Experience and Plasticity (400, 600 levels)
Seminar on Cognitive Neuroscience (400, 600 levels)
Seminar on Computational Neuroscience (400, 600 levels)
Seminar on Blind Source Separation Techniques for EEG Signal Processing. (400, 600 levels)
Seminar on Dialogue: ideas of David Bohm

Honors and Awards

Phi Beta Kappa; William James Merit Scholarship from Harvard University; Ph.D. Thesis Award from the International Society for Women in Cognitive Neuroscience in association with the Society for Cognitive Neuroscience Conference; grants and contracts from Sloan Foundation, National Foundation for Functional Brain Imaging (now MIND Research Network), Defense Advanced Research Program Agency (DARPA), and Sandia National Laboratory; gifts from private donors.

In the News

UNM Today reports on our publication in the Proceedings of National Academy of Sciences. Science News coverage of our work has been picked up by news agencies such as DIE WELT, a German national daily paper, LA STAMPA, one of the best-known, most influential and most widely sold Italian daily newspapers, South Asia News, NewsTrack India, PsychCentral, and Medical News Today.

Publications

  1. Dinces SM, Romeo RD, McEwen BS, Tang AC. (2014). Enhancing offspring hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) regulation via systematic novelty exposure: the influence of maternal HPA function. Front Behav Neurosci. 2014 Jun 5;8:204. doi: 10.3389/fnbeh.2014.00204. eCollection 2014.
  2. Yuan Zhang, Akaysha C. Tang, Xiaolin Zhou (2014). Synchronized network activity as the origin of a P300 component in a facial attractiveness judgment task. Psychophysiology. 51(3) 285-9.
  3. Akaysha C. Tang, Bethany Reeb-Sutherland, Russell D. Romeo, and Bruce S. McEwen (2014). On the causes of early life experience effects: Evaluating the role of mom. Front Neuroendocrinol. 2014 Apr;35(2):245-51. doi: 10.1016/j.yfrne.2013.11.002. Epub 2013 Nov 15.
  4. M. Saggar, BG King, AP Zanesco, KA Maclean, SR Aichele, TL Jacobs, DA Bridwell, PR Shaver, EL Rosenberg, BK Sahdra, E Ferrer, AC Tang, GR Mangun, BA Wallace, R Miikkulainen, CD Saron. (2012). Intensive training induces longitudinal changes in meditation state-related EEG oscillatory activity. Front Hum Neurosci. 6:256.
  5. Akaysha C. Tang, Bethany Reeb-Sutherland, Russell D. Romeo, and Bruce S. McEwen (2012). Reducing behavioral inhibition to novelty via systematic neonatal novelty exposure: the influence of maternal hypothalmic-pituitary-adrenal regulation. Biol. Psychiatry,72(2):150-6.
  6. Akaysha C. Tang, Zhen Yang, Bethany Reeb-Sutherland, Russell D. Romeo, and Bruce S. McEwen (2012). Maternal modulation of novelty effect on physical development. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci. 109(6):2120-2125.
  7. Bethany Reeb-Sutherland and Akaysha C. Tang (2012). Functional Specificity in Modulation of Novelty Exposure Effects by Reliability of Maternal Care. Beh. Brain Res. 226(1):345-50
  8. Bethany Reeb-Sutherland and Akaysha C. Tang (2011). Dissociation between Neonatal Novelty-Induced Simultaneous Enhancement in Cognitive, Social, and Emotional Functions from Maternal Care. Beh.Brain Res. 224(2):318-25.
  9. Akaysha C. Tang, Huan Jiang, Zhen Yang, Ying Zhang, Russell D. Romeo, and Bruce S. McEwen (2011). Converging Influence of Neonatal Novelty Experience and Maternal Self-Stress Regulation on the Plasticity of Offspring Acoustic Startle Response Latency. Beh. Brain Res. 221(1):253-60.
  10. Akaysha C. Tang, Bethany C. Reeb-Sutherland, and Zhen Yang (2011). Functional Brain Symmetry in Adult Novelty Response: On Fluidity of Early Experience Effects. Beh. Brain Res. 221(1):91-7.
  11. Akaysha C. Tang, Bethany C. Reeb-Sutherland, Zhen Yang, Russell D. Romeo, and Bruce S. McEwen (2011). Postnatal Novelty-Induced Persistent Enhancement in Offspring Spatial Memory and the Modulatory Role of Maternal Self-Stress Regulation. J. Neurosci. 31(14): 5348 –5352.
  12. Zhen Yang and Akaysha C. Tang (2011). Novelty-induced enhancement in spatial memory: Is infancy a critical period? Behav Brain Res, Beh. Brain Res. 219 (1).
  13. Akaysha C. Tang, Matthew T. Sutherland, and Zhen Yang (2010). Capturing “Trial-to-Trial” Variations in Human Brain Activity: from Laboratory to Real World(text only, figs upon request). In Functional Significance of Neuronal Variability, Ed. Ming-Zhou Ding and Dennis Glanzman. Oxford University Press.
  14. Akaysha C. Tang (2010). Applications of Second Order Blind Identification to High-Density EEG-Based Brain Imaging: A Review. Lecture Notes in Computer Science. Springer. Also in Proceedings of International Symposium on Neural Networks, 2010, Shanghai, China.
  15. Russell D. Romeo, Akaysha C. Tang, and Regina M. Sullivan (2009). Early life experiences: enduring behavioral, neurological and endocrinological consequences. In D. Pfaff, A. Arnold, A. Etgen, S. Fahrbach, R. Rubin (Eds.) Hormones, Brain, and Behavior, 2nd ed. Academic Press.
  16. Katherine G. Akers, Zhen Yang, Dominic P. Delvecchio, Bethany C. Reeb, Russell D. Romeo, Bruce S. McEwen, and Akaysha C. Tang (2008). Social competitiveness and plasticity of neuroendicrine function in old age: influence of neonatal novelty exposure and maternal care reliability. PLoS ONE., 3(7).
  17. Akaysha C. Tang, Bende Zou, Bethany C. Reeb, and John A. Conner (2008). An epigenetic induction of a right-shift in hippocampul asymmetry: selectivity for short- and long-term potentiation but not post-tetanic potentiation. Hippocampus, 18:5-10.
  18. Peng Sun, Zhen Yang, Amy M. Korzekwa, Matthew T. Sutherland, and Akaysha C. Tang (2007). Determining Gender from Local Network Synchronization in the Frontal Cortex. Proceedings of the International Conference for Cognitive Neurodynamics. (ICCN 2007), Shanghai, P.R.China; November 17-21, 2007.
  19. Akaysha C. Tang, Matthew T. Sutherland, Peng Sun, Yang Zhen, Masato Nakazawa, Amy M. Korzekwa, ZhangYan, and Mingzhou Ding (2007). Top-down versus bottom-up processing in the human brain: Distinct directional influences revealed by integrating SOBI and Granger causality. Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Independent Component Analysis and Signal Separation (ICA 2007), London, UK; http://www.elec.qmul.ac.uk/ica2007/papers.html.
  20. Matthew T. Sutherland and Akaysha C. Tang (2006). Reliable detection of bilateral activation in human primary somatosensory cortex by unilteral median nerve stimulation. NeuroImage, 33(4): 1042-1054.
  21. Akaysha C. Tang, Matthew T. Sutherland, Christopher J. McKinney, Jing-Yu Liu, Yan Wang, Lucas C. Parra, Adam D. Gerson, and Paul Sajda (2006). Classifying single-trial ERPs from visual and frontal cortex during free viewing. In: IEEE Proceedings of the 2006 International Joint Conference on Neural Networks (IJCNN 2006), July 16-21, 2006; Vancouver, BC, Canada; pp. 1376-1383.
  22. Matthew T. Sutherland and Akaysha C. Tang. (2006). Blind Source Separation can Recover Systematically Distributed Neuronal Sources from "Resting" EEG. In: EURASIP Proceedings of the Second International Symposium on Communications, Control, and Signal Processing (ISCCP 2006). March 13-15, Marrakech, Morocco; http://www.eurasip.org/content/Eusipco/isccsp06/defevent/papers/cr1307.pdf.
  23. Akaysha C. Tang, Matthew T. Sutherland, and Yan Wang (2006). Contrasting Single-Trial ERPs between Experimental Manipulations: Improving Differntiability by Blind Source Separation. NeuroImage, 29(1): 335-346.
  24. Akaysha C. Tang, Katherine G. Akers, Bethany C. Reeb, Russell D. Romeo, and Bruce S. McEwen (2006). Programming social, cognitive, and neuroendocrine development by early exposure to novelty. Proc. Nat. Acad. Sci., 103(42): 15716-21.
  25. Masato Nakazawa and Akaysha C. Tang (2006). Adult aggression during an initial social encounter: Effect of neonatal anoxia and relation to juvenile open-field activity. Neuroscience Letters, 408: 119-123.
  26. Katherine G. Akers, Masato Nakazawa, Russell D. Romeo, John A. Connor, Bruce S. McEwen, and Akaysha C. Tang (2006). Early Life Modulators and Predictors of Adult Synaptic Plasticity. European Journal of Neuroscience, 24(2): 547-554.
  27. Akaysha C. Tang, Jing-Yu Liu, and Matthew T. Sutherland (2005). Recovery of Correlated Neuronal Sources from EEG: The Good and Bad Ways of using SOBI. NeuroImage, 28(2): 507-519.
  28. Akaysha C. Tang, Matthew T. Sutherland, and Christopher J. McKinney (2005). Validation of SOBI components from high-density EEG. NeuroImage, 25(2): 539-553.
  29. Akaysha C. Tang and Masato Nakazawa (2005). Neonatal Novelty Exposure Ameliorates Anoxia-Induced Hyperactivity in the Open Field. Behavioural Brain Research, 163: 1-9.
  30. Akaysha C. Tang, Masato Nakazawa, Russell D. Romeo, Bethany C. Reeb, Helene Sisti, and Bruce S. McEwen (2005). Effects of Long-Term Estrogen Replacement on Social Investigation and Social Memory in Ovariectomized C57BL/6 Mice. Hormones & Behavior, 47: 350-357.
  31. Bethany C. Reeb and Akaysha C. Tang (2005). Sex Difference in Temporal Patterns of Social Interaction and Its Dependence upon Neonatal Novelty Exposure. Behavioural Brain Research, 158: 359-365.
  32. Katherine G. Akers, Bethany C. Reeb, and Akaysha C. Tang (2004). Developmentally Stable Sex-Dependent Modulation of Turning Asymmetry by Neonatal Novelty Exposure. Behavioural Brain Research, 155: 257-263.
  33. Akaysha C. Tang and Bethany C. Reeb (2004). Neonatal Novelty Exposure, Dynamics of Brain Asymmetry, and Social Recognition Memory. Developmental Psychobiology, 44: 84-93.
  34. Yan Wang, Matthew T. Sutherland, Lori L. Sanfratello, and Akaysha C. Tang. (2004). Single-Trial Classification of ERPs Using Second-Order Blind Identification (SOBI). In: IEEE Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Machine Learning and Cybernetics; August 26-29, 2004; Shanghai, China; vol. 7, pp.4246-4251. as printed.
  35. Matthew T. Sutherland, Jingyu Liu, and Akaysha C. Tang. (2004). Temporal Delays in Blind Identification of Primary Somatosensory Cortex. In: IEEE Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Machine Learning and Cybernetics; August 26-29, 2004; Shanghai, China; vol. 7, pp.4222-4227 as printed.
  36. Terry A. Loring, David E. Worth, and Akaysha C. Tang. (2004). Single-Trial Multiresolution Metrics for Detecting Single-Trial Evoked Response Potentials (ERPs) . In: IEEE Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Machine Learning and Cybernetics; August 26-29, 2004; Shanghai, China; vol. 7, pp.4240-4245.
  37. Akaysha C. Tang, Bethany C. Reeb, Russell D. Romeo, and Bruce S. McEwen (2003). Modification of Social Memory, HPA Axis, and Brain Asymmetry By Neonatal Novelty Exposure.' Journal of Neuroscience, 23(23): 8254-8260.
  38. Akaysha C. Tang, Masato Nakazawa, and Bethany C. Reeb (2003). Neonatal Novelty Exposure Affects Sex Difference in Open Field Disinhibition. NeuroReport, 14: 1553-1556.
  39. Akaysha C. Tang (2003). A Hippocampal Theory of Cerebral Lateralization. In The Asymmetrical Brain, edited by Kenneth Hugdahl and Richard J. Davidson. 2nd Edition, 37-68 MIT Press.
  40. Akaysha C. Tang and Barak A. Pearlmutter (2003). Independent Components of Magnetoencephalography: Localization and Single-Trial Response Onset Detection. In Magnetic Source Imaging of the Human Brain. Invited Chapter for a festschrift in honor of Samuel Williamson, edited by Lloyd Kaufman and Zhong Lin Lu. Lawrence Eribaum and Associated (LEA).
  41. Akaysha C. Tang and Bende Zou (2002). Neonatal Exposure to Novelty Enhanced Long-Term Potentiation in CA1 of the Rat Hippocampus. Hippocampus,12(3): 398-404.
  42. Akaysha C. Tang and Timothy Verstynen (2002). Early Life Environment Modulates "Handedness" in Rats. Behavioural Brain Research, 131: 1-7.
  43. Akaysha C. Tang, Barak A. Pearlmutter, Natalie A. Malaszenko, and Dan B. Phung (2002). Independent Components of Magnetoencephalography: Single-trial Response Onset Time Estimation. NeuroImage, 17(4): 1773-1789.
  44. Akaysha C. Tang, Barak A. Pearlmutter, Natalie A. Malaszenko, Dan B. Phung and Bethany C. Reeb (2002). Independent Components of Magnetoencephalography: Localization. Neural Computation, 14(8): 1827-1858.
  45. L. Parra, C. Alvino, Akaysha C. Tang, B. Pearlmutter, N. Yeung, A. Osman, and P. Sajda (2002). Linear Spatial Integration for Single Trial Detection in Encephalography. NeuroImage, 17(1): 223-230.
  46. Akaysha C. Tang and Barak A. Pearlmutter (2002). Independent Components of Magnetoencephalography: Localization. In Frederich T. Sommer and Andrzej Wichert (eds) Exploratory Analysis and Data Modelling in Functional Neuroimaging. MIT Press, chapter 7, pages 129-162. This is an invited republication of Tang et al., 2002, Neural Computation, 14(8): 1827-1858. With copyright permissions.
  47. Akaysha C. Tang (2001). Neonatal Exposure to Novel Environment Enhanced Hippocampal-Dependent Memory Function During Infancy and Adulthood. Learning & Memory, Sep-Oct;8(5): 257-64.
  48. Bende Zou, Golijeh Golarai, John A. Connor, and Akaysha C. Tang (2001). Neonatal Exposure to a Novel Envirornment Enhances the Effects of Corticosterone on Neuronal Excitability and Plasticity in adult Hippocampus. Developmental Brain Research, Sep 23;130(1): 1-7.
  49. Timothy Verstynen, Robert Tierney, Tina Urbanski, and Akaysha C. Tang (2001). Neonatal Novelty Exposure Modulates Hippocampus Volumetric Asymmetry in the Rat. NeuroReport, Oct 8;12(14): 3019-22.
  50. Akaysha C. Tang, Barak A. Pearlmutter, Tim Hely, Michael Zibulevsky, and Michael P. Weisend (2000). A MEG Study of Response Latency and Variability in the Human Visual System During a Visual-Motor Integration Task . Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 12, S.A. Solla, T.K. Leen, and K.R. Muller (Eds.) 181-191 MIT Press.
  51. Akaysha C. Tang, Dan Phung, Barak A. Pearlmutter, and Robert Christner (2000). Localization of Independent Components from Magnetoencephalography. ICA-2000.
  52. Akaysha C. Tang, Barak A. Pearlmutter, Michael Zibulevsky and Scott A. Carter (1999). Blind Source Sepatation of Multichannel Neuromagnetic Responses . Neural Computing, 32-33: 1115-1120.
  53. Akaysha C. Tang, Andreas M. Bartels, and Terrence J. Sejnowski (1998). Effects of neuromodulation on spike frequency adaptation and spike timing. In: Proceedings of the Annual Computational Neuroscience Conference (1997). Luwer Academic Publishers, Boston.
  54. Akaysha C. Tang, Andreas M. Bartels, and Terrence J. Sejnowski (1997). Effects of cholinergic modulation on neocortical neurons in responses to fluctuating inputs. Cerebral Cortex, 7: 502-9.
  55. Akaysha C. Tang, Andreas M. Bartels, and Terrence J. Sejnowski (1997). Cholinergic modulation preserves spike timing under physiologically realistic fluctuating input. In Advances in Neural Information Processing Systems 9., Ed: Michael C. Mozer, Michael I. Jordan, and Thomas Petsche. Morgan Kaufman. 111-117.
  56. Akaysha C. Tang and Michael E. Hasselmo (1996). Effect of long term baclofen treatment on recognition memory and novelty detection. Behavioral Brain Research, 74: 145-152.
  57. Akaysha C. Tang and Michael E. Hasselmo (1995). To recognize the new, must one remember the old? GABAergic modulation and its computational and behavioral consequences. In: Proceedings of the Annual Computational Neuroscience Conference, Luwer Academic Publishers, Boston.
  58. Akaysha C. Tang and Michael E. Hasselmo (1994). Selective suppression of intrinsic but not afferent fiber synaptic transmission by baclofen in the piriform (olfactory) cortex. Brain Research, 659: 75-81.
  59. Wu, JY, Tsau, Y, Hopp, HP, Cohen, LB, and Akaysha C. Tang (1994). Consistency in nervous systems: trial-to-trial and animal-to-animal variations in the responses to repeated applications of a sensory stimulus in Aplysia. Journal of Neuroscience, Mar;14(3 Pt 1): 1366-84.
  60. Akaysha C. Tang, C.X. Falk, L.B. Cohen, B.A. Pearlmutter, H.P. Hopp, and J.Y. Wu (1993). The majority of the neurons in the Aplysia ganglion show unreliable response to siphon stimulation. Proceedings of International Joined Conference on Neural Networks.
  61. Falk,CX, Wu,JY, Cohen,LB, and Akaysha C. Tang (1993). Non-uniform Expression of Habituation in the activity of distinct classes of neurons in the Aplysia abdominal ganglion. Journal of Neuroscience13(9): 4072-4081.
  62. Akaysha C. Tang and Leslie Smith (1992). Speaker independent vowel recognition. In Neural Networks for Vision, Speech and Natural Language. Ed: R. Linggard, D.J. Myers, and C. Nightingale. Chapman and Hall. 456-66.

Selected Talks

  1. The Third Mental Health Conference “Early Identification and Intervention of Mental Disorders”. Jinhua, China. Nov. 16-17, 2013. Host: Fei Luo. Reliability and Interpretability of High-Density EEG-based Source Imaging--Enabling Tools for Innovative Clinical Diagnosis and Treatment.
  2. Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, The State University of New Jersey Rutgers. New Brunswick, NJ. Host: Mary Rigdon. Oct. 2013. Reliability and Interpretability of High-Density EEG-based Source Imaging--Enabling Tools for a Cognitive Neuroscience of the Individual.
  3. Center for Social and Cognitive Neuroscience, University of Chicago. Chicago, IL. Host: John Cacioppo. May 30, 2013. Reliability and interpretability of high density EEG-based Source Imaging--enabling tools for a cognitive neuroscience of the individual.
  4. Cleveland Clinic, Epilepsy Grand Rounds. Cleveland, OH. Host: Norman So. March 22, 2013. How might advances in SOBI transform clinical diagnosis and health care practice?
  5. Institute of Psychology, Academy of Science, Sinica, Beijing, China. Host: Fei Luo. Oct 12, 2011. Novelty, Mother, and Development Across Life Span.
  6. Child Development Laboratory, University of Maryland, College Park, MD, USA. Host: Nathan Fox. Dec 13, 2010. Top-Down versus Bottom-up Processing in the Human Brain: Distinct Directional Influences Revealed by Integrating SOBI and Granger Causality.
  7. Neuroimaging Research Branch, National Institute on Drug Abuse-Intramural Research Program, NIH/DHHS, Baltimore, MD, USA. Host: Elliot Stein. Dec. 20, 2010. Applications of Second Order Blind Identification to High-Density EEG-Based Brain Imaging.
  8. Special Session on Signal Processing for Brain Imaging, International Symposiums on Neural Networks (ISNN), Shanghai, China. Host: Jianting Cao. June 6-9, 2010. Applications of Second Order Blind Identification to High-Density EEG-Based Brain Imaging: A Review
  9. Department of Psychology, Beijing University, Beijing, China. Host: XiaoLin Zhou. June 6, 2010. Applications of Second Order Blind Identification to High-Density EEG-Based Brain Imaging
  10. Institute of Psychology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing, China. Host: Fei Luo. June 3, 2010. Applications of Second Order Blind Identification to High-Density EEG-Based Brain Imaging
  11. Enabling Stress Resistance Workshop, DARPA", San Deigo, CA. Host: Amy Kruse. July 3, 2009. Long-lasting Modification of Individual Stress Resistance: Three Longitudinal Studies.
  12. Dynamic Neuroscience Symposium, Society for Neuroscience Annual Meeting, Washington, DC. Hosts: Dennis Glanzman & Mingzhou Ding. Nov, 2008. Top-Down versus Bottom-up Processing in the Human Brain: Distinct Directional Influences Revealed by Integrating SOBI and Granger Causality.
  13. International Society for Developmental Psychobiology Annual Meeting, Washington, DC. Nov. 2008. Beyond maternal licking-grooming: modulation of early stimulation effects by maternal physiology.
  14. Society for Neuroscience Annual Conference. San Diego, CA. Nov. 7, 2007. Top-Down versus Bottom-up Processing in the Human Brain: Distinct Directional Influences Revealed by Integrating SOBI and Granger Causality.
  15. Society for Neuroscience Annual Conference. San Diego, CA. Nov. 7, 2007. Measuring feed- forward and feed-back influence in the brains of 2-day old human infants by integrating SOBI and Granger causality
  16. International Conference on Independent Component Analysis (ICA 2007). London, UK. Sept 9-13, 2007. Top-Down versus Bottom-up Processing in the Human Brain: Distinct Directional Influences Revealed by Integrating SOBI and Granger Causality.
  17. International Society for Developmental Psychobiology. Atlanta, GA. October 13, 2006. What makes an adaptive rat—“better” mothers or early exposure to novelty?
  18. New York State Psychiatric Institute / Columbia University. New York, NY. Host: Harry Shair. August, 2006. Programming social, cognitive, and neuroendocrine development by early exposure to novelty.
  19. Department of Psychology, Trieste University, Trieste, Italy, Host: Gorgio Vallortegara. June 2005. How to make a smart rat.
  20. Institute of Cognitive Neuroscience, University College London, London, UK. Host: Ray Dolan. May 2005. How to make a smart rat.
  21. Center for Brain and Cognitive Development (CBDB), University College London, London, UK. Host: Mark Johnson. April, 2005. Extraction of single-trial ERP during free viewing.
  22. Schwartz Center, University of California, San Diego. San Diego, CA. Host: Scott Makeig. June, 2004. Extraction of single-trial ERP during free viewing.
  23. Hot topic talk at the Annual Meeting of American Psychological Society, Chicago, IL. May 28, 2004. Modification of Social Memory and Brain Asymmetry by Neonatal Novelty Exposure.
  24. Department of Psychology, Boston University, Boston, MA. Host: Michael Hasselmo. March 19, 2004. Modification of Social memory, hypothalamic-Pituitary-Adrenal Axis, and Brain Asymmetry by Neonatal Novelty Exposure.
  25. Brigham and Women’s Hospital Neuroendocrinology Group, Harvard Medical School. Boston, MA. Host: Janis Anderson. March 15, 2004. Application of Blind Source Separation to MEG and EEG.
  26. Department of Psychology, University of Southern California, Los Angles, CA. Host: Zhonglin Lu. Oct. 2, 2003. Applications to a Blind Source Separation Algorithm to human MEG and EEG.
  27. Department of Cognitive Science, University of California-Irvine, Irvine, CA. Host: George Sperling. Oct. 1, 2003. Applications to a Blind Source Separation Algorithm to human MEG and EEG.
  28. The Advanced Concept Group at Sandia National Laboratory, Albuquerque, NM. Host: Gerold Yonas. April 17, 2003. Cognitive Enhancement: from animal models to humans.
  29. Department of Biomedical Engineering, Oregon Graduate Institute, Oregon Health and Sciences University, Portland, OR. Host: Misha Pavel. April 11, 2003. The making of a smart rat---from neonatal novelty exposure to enhanced synaptic plasticity and memory at adulthood.
  30. Electrical Geodesics, Inc. Eugene, OR, Host: Don Tucker. April 10, 2003. Localization and Single-Trial Response Timing Analysis of Human Magnetoencephalography and Electroencephalography Data using Second Order Blind Identification (SOBI).
  31. Sackler Institute for Developmental Psychobiology, New York, NY. Host: B.J Casey. Jan 22, 2002. Enhancing cognitive development through early life environmental manipulation.
  32. The Albert Einstein College of Medicine, 'New York, NY. Host: Patrick Stanton. May 14, 2001. Neonatal novelty exposure enhances cognitive performance and hippocampal synaptic plasticity.
  33. Laboratory of Neuroendocrinology, Rockefeller University, New York, NY. Host: Bruce McEwen. May 11, 2001. Neonatal novelty exposure enhances cognitive performance and hippocampal synaptic plasticity.
  34. Symposium at Society for Psychophysiological Research, 40th Annual Meeting, San Diego, CA. Oct. 2000. Measuring populational response timing in humans using magnetoencephalography and blind source separation.
  35. RUMPBA Workshop, Rutgers University. Newark, NJ. Host: Steve Hanson. June 2000. Single-trial response onset time measurement from MEG data using blind source separation.
  36. Keck Center, University of California-San Francisco, San Francisco, CA. April 2000. Neonatal novelty enhances hippocampal dependent learning and hippocampal synaptic plasticity.
  37. Welcome Department of Cognitive Neurology, University College of London, London, UK. Host: S. Zeki. Summer 1998. Functional Significance of Cerebral Lateralization.
  38. Santa Fe Institute. Santa Fe, NM. April 1998. Host: Ellen Goldberg. Neuromodulation of Spike Timing.
  39. The Annual Meeting of Society for Cognitive Neuroscience, Boston, MA. March 1997. PhD Thesis Award presentation: A neural mechanism of differential integration and recognition memory.
  40. Siemens Corporate Research, Learning Department, Princeton, NJ. Host: Steve J. Hanson. April 1995. To recognize the new, must one remember the old?---GABAergic modulation and its behavioral and computational consequences.

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